RSS feeds from ecb.co.uk

Women's news RSS

Colvin confident England have the answer

Follow England women's progress on ecb.co.uk - click here for exclusive interviews and videos, latest news, match reports and more

The countdown is on for England’s hopes of retaining the Women’s World Cup and they are well-placed to do the maths that could get them to the final, according to Holly Colvin.

In the last round of Super Six games tomorrow Charlotte Edwards’ side face New Zealand in a day/nighter after West Indies play confirmed finalists Australia during the day.

Should the Southern Stars keep their 100 per cent record in this month’s competition, victory for England or the White Ferns would draw them level on six points with the Windies.

With wins failing to separate the second and third-placed teams, the other finalist would be decided on net run-rate. England and New Zealand would therefore not only be trying to beat the other, but by a sufficient margin to usurp the West Indies in second place.

Holly Colvin

Despite her 10 A*s at GCSE and four As at A-Level, including maths, Holly Colvin said: “I’m a player that doesn’t worry about numbers.”

Among England’s regulars is Colvin, who gained 10 A*s at GCSE and four As at A-Level, including maths.

However, the 23-year-old left-arm spinner revealed that it is design technology teacher and batting all-rounder Arran Brindle who will likely do the calculations akin to those formerly made by Carol Vorderman on popular television show Countdown.

Colvin told ecb.co.uk: “Arran Brindle has been our Carol Vorderman so far. She’s done a sterling job. So she might be on to it. But at the same time, is she needs to bat, then I’m sure someone else will be onto it quite quickly.”

Colvin, who has 82 wickets in 64 one-day internationals at an average of 23.25, may not be working it out herself - despite having taken a maths module in the first year of her natural sciences degree at Durham University.

“I’m a player that doesn’t worry about numbers,” she admitted. “For example, when I’m bowling I don’t know my figures. I’ve no idea how many wickets I’ve taken. I’m not a numbers girl. I’m more about feeling and making sure you’re focused on the task at hand rather than numbers.”

If England and New Zealand are advantaged by knowing the outcome of Australia versus West Indies before their later game is decided, Colvin is adamant that she and her team-mates will be fully focussed on beating the White Ferns at Mumbai’s Brabourne Stadium.

“The Australia-West Indies game is completely out of our hands,” she said. “We’ve just got to make sure that we focus on New Zealand as well as we can. If everyone performs well and comes to the party tomorrow we have no doubt that will happen.

Should the Southern Stars beat the Windies at the Bandra Kurla Complex, also in Mumbai, the margin of victory over the White Ferns required to earn a final berth will naturally be relayed to the England players - perhaps by Brindle.

Arran Brindle

“Arran Brindle has been our Carol Vorderman so far," Colvin said of the pictured player who has done England's maths at the World Cup

“Obviously it’ll be helpful to know what’s going, but we won’t focus too much on that,” Colvin added.

“It’s not like we just want to win as well as we need to. We want to win and we want to win well. As much as we’ll probably see how that game’s gone, we’ve got to make sure that we put that to bed and focus on our game.”

Even if West Indies defeat Australia to reach Sunday’s final, thus making tomorrow’s televised day/night match a likely dress rehearsal for Friday’s third-place play-off, Colvin can take inspiration from previous meetings with New Zealand.

In particular, the World Cup final triumph at Sydney four years ago in which Colvin hit the run that sealed a nervous four-wicket win.

“That was a really close game, that World Cup final in 2009,” she recalled.

“We came out on top and we’ve had quite a few pressure situations with them before and we’re keen to add one more win onto them. We’ve got every confidence in beating them tomorrow.”